How to Make a Replacement Post Motor HEPA Filter for Prolux Upright Vacuums

Owning any vacuum requires maintenance. At GreatVacs we understand the importance of understanding how to properly maintain your vacuum. In this video, we explain how to make your own replacement post-motor HEPA filter using a Kirby bag.

Important Safety Tips

  • Always make sure your machine is unplugged and the power button is turned off, before servicing your vacuum.
  • Always make sure your hands are dry and free from moisture before servicing your machine.
  • Be sure to wear gloves when servicing your machine to prevent any cuts or scrapes.
  • If you are uncomfortable working on your vacuum, please don’t hesitate to contact us at service@greatvacs.com and we can help you through the process or you can send it into us to fix it for you. 

 

Tools

  • Your existing post-motor filter
  • A HEPA bag
  • Scissors
  • Marker

 

Instructions

 

Take your existing post-motor filter and lay it on the HEPA bag.

 

Using your marker, trace the filter.

 

Then cut along the line you made.

 

Now you have a new filter that’s the same size as the old one! The great thing about the HEPA bag is that you can make about 3-4 replacement filters!

 

Need a HEPA bag to make your own filters? Click here!

 

Interested in a Prolux upright vacuum cleaner? Follow the links below for the different models.

 

Prolux 7000

Prolux 9000

 

Already have one of these amazing vacuums, but need supplies? We sell them!

 

10 Pack of Bags

New HEPA filter (for 7000/9000 models only)

2 Pack of Belts

 

Don't forget, GreatVacs is the only authorized dealer of Prolux products, so if you need any parts, supplies or have any questions, email as service@greatvacs.com or leave a comment! You can also head on over to our YouTube channel to see more educational videos on all Prolux products.

 

How to Make a Replacement Post Motor HEPA Filter for Prolux Upright Vacuums

How to Make a Replacement Post Motor HEPA Filter for Prolux Upright Vacuums

Owning any vacuum requires maintenance. At GreatVacs we understand the importance of understanding how to properly maintain your vacuum. In this video,...

Read more

How to Perform Basic Vacuum Maintenance

No matter what type of vacuum you have, they all have one thing in common – they need to be maintained. Just like anything with moving parts, a lack of maintenance can cause premature wearing out of components that keeps your vacuum working at its best. In this video Kyle goes over some basic tips to keep your vacuum in tip top shape, and last for years to come!

Important Safety Tips

  • Always make sure your machine is unplugged and the power button is turned off, before servicing your vacuum.
  • Always make sure your hands are dry and free from moisture before servicing your machine.
  • Be sure to wear gloves when servicing your machine to prevent any cuts or scrapes.
  • If you are uncomfortable working on your vacuum, please don’t hesitate to contact us at service@greatvacs.com and we can help you through the process or you can send it into us to fix it for you. 

 

Instructions

 

We’ll start off going over why your vacuum cleaner may have poor performance. You could have a full bag or dirt bin, you could have a dirty, clogged filter, your head or hose could be clogged, the brush roll may be covered in hair, or you have seized brush roll bearings.

 

We will be using this specialty maintenance tool. To make it easy, we’re including this tool with most of the vacuums we sell!

 

First, we will go over how to change a full bag or dirt bin. Most vacuums have a full bag indicator light that is located on the canister, which makes it easy to know when you need to swap out the bag with a new one. If your vacuum cleaner uses a dirt bin, you can easily see when it needs to be emptied.

 

If your full indicator light comes on and the bag isn’t actually full, you may have a clog in the head, hose or wand. The vacuum will notice the decrease in suction and may assume the bag is full. To empty the bag you will first need to located the bag chamber. Once opened you will simply remove the bag, throw it away, and put in a new, empty bag. If your vacuum has a bag holder, make sure you don’t throw it away!

 

If your vacuum uses a dirt bin, it’s very simple. Just detach the bin from the vacuum, hold over the trash can, and open the trap door.

 

Next, we’ll go over dirty or clogged filter. If the filter is dirty or clogged it will reduce air flow and can cause the motor to overwork and overheat. This could, in turn, cause the motor to turn off for safety reasons. Most vacuums have a pre- and post-motor filters and you will find them behind a cover or in the bag chamber. Check both filters and clean them if they look dirty.

 

To clean the filters, start by removing them. Then give them a good smack with your hand to remove loose dirt.  Do this outside to avoid making a huge mess in your home.

 

Then, take the specialty tool and use the brush side to get deep down into the grooves. After you’re done the filter should look new again. You may have to repeat it a few times to get all the dirt out.

 

Now, we’ll go over a clogged head, hose, or wand. We mentioned earlier that there may be a clog if the full bag indicator light comes on without the bag actually being full. You may also notice reduced suction and pickup if there’s a clog. The head may even spit debris back out.

 

Start with the wand because it’s the easiest. You put it up to your eye and check to see if you can see light at the other end. If you can see straight through with no problem it isn’t clogged. Can’t see through? You’ve just found a clog!

 

To remove the clog you can use an air compressor, or, if you vacuum has a blower feature, you can use that. You can also use a broom handle or other straight, rigid item to push the clog out.

 

Next up is the hose. The easiest way to diagnose a hose clog is to hook it up to the vacuum, turn it on, and put your hand over the other end of the hose. If you can’t feel suction, or it's very poor, there is a clog or blockage in the hose. Dislodging the clog is the same as with the wand – either use a long, straight, rigid object to push it through, or use an air compressor or blower feature from the vacuum.

 

Lastly, we have the power head. The most common places for clogs are in the pivot neck or suction port. You may be able to access the clog through the pivot neck and just pull it out. Otherwise, the easiest way to remove is the clog is to take the power head apart. Most are held together with screws.

 

Take the screws out and remove the top portion from the power head. If you see a clog you should be able to easily remove it.

 

Another common reason for poor vacuum performance is a hair covered brush roll. We recommend removing the brush roll from the power head before removing the hair.

 

Once the brush roll is removed you can use the specialty tool to cut the hairs, and then grab and pull them off.

 

The last common problem we’ll be covering is seized brush roll bearings. This will prevent your brush roll from spinning, which will result in dirt or debris not being picked up. Depending on your brush roll, you may not be able to access the bearings. If that’s the case contact us and we’ll help you get a replacement brush roll.

 

When the brush roll has been removed from the vacuum you can use the specialty tool to brush away dirt, or use the razor to cut away hairs from the end where the bearings are.

 

If you need any parts, supplies or have any questions, email us at service@greatvacs.com or leave a comment! You can also head on over to our YouTube channel to see more educational videos.

 

 

How to Perform Basic Vacuum Maintenance

How to Perform Basic Vacuum Maintenance

No matter what type of vacuum you have, they all have one thing in common – they need to be maintained. Just like anything with moving parts, a lack...

Read more

Central Vacuums 101: Frequently Asked Questions

Is your central vacuum acting up? If it’s making weird noise, or just doesn’t have enough suction, this video is for you. Andrew goes over many common problems or issues you might run into when dealing with a central vacuum.

Central vacuum systems are a good investment, but like all investments, they require routine maintenance. No matter what make or model vacuum you have, these tips will work for you!

 

Important Safety Tips

  • Always make sure your machine is unplugged and the power button is turned off, before servicing your vacuum.
  • Always make sure your hands are dry and free from moisture before servicing your machine.
  • Be sure to wear gloves when servicing your machine to prevent any cuts or scrapes.
  • If you are uncomfortable working on your vacuum, please don’t hesitate to contact us at service@greatvacs.com and we can help you through the process or you can send it into us to fix it for you. 

 

The Parts of a Central Vacuum Unit

 

You will notice four ports on the outside of a central vacuum unit. 

All of the ports on the bottom are for suction. The piping from your home will go into either the left or right bottom ports. Most homes only use one, so we will use that set up for our demonstration.

 

 

Your piping will hook up to one side and the other will have a length of PVC pipe with a cap on the end. A common problem we’ve seen is that homeowners hook up their pipe correctly on one side and leave the other side open, with no cap. When this happens the suction will go through the open port and you won’t have suction in the rest of your house.

 

The port on the front has suction, but you will also notice it has a lid with a seal. This needs to be closed for the central vacuum to have suction in the rest of your house. The purpose of this port is so you can attach the hose and vacuum the room where the central vacuum is located – like your garage or basement.

 

The port on the top is the exhaust port. Our units come with the exhaust muffler you see hooked up here. When the muffler is installed it will quiet the machine down while it’s running. Some people buy additional PVC piping and route the exhaust to the outside of the house. This blows the hot air outside and also further decreases the noise.

 

How a Central Vacuum Works

 

The central vacuum unit is usually installed on the wall of the garage. There will be piping that runs throughout the entire house and these pipes will end in hose connectors. The hose connection for our demonstration is right at the end of the suction pipe.

 

Your hose will plug into the wall outlet. Many central vacuum owners don’t realize that the wall outlet actually has wires that run all the way back to the central vacuum unit through the walls. These wires tell the central vacuum unit to turn on.

 

Each hose has two metal bands at the end that plugs in.

 

If you look inside the wall outlet you’ll see two brass tabs.

 

These brass tabs need to contact the metal bands of the hose for the unit to work.

 

There are two styles of hose. The first is “direct connect,” where you’ll see two prongs that stick out at the end. These prongs will plug into the port on the wall outlet when you plug the hose in.

The other style is “pigtail.” This style actually has a cord that comes from the hose and needs to be plugged into your standard 120V wall outlet.

All of our central vacuum units work with either hose style.

 

How Do Central Vacuum Wall Outlets Work?

 

As you can see in our demonstration, there is a wire that runs from the wall outlet to the unit. This wire send a signal when the hose is plugged to let the central vac unit know when to turn on. This means the vacuum doesn’t need to run constantly and you don’t need to go out to your garage to turn it on every time you want to vacuum!

If you were to plug your hose in sideways, both brass tabs would be touching the same metal tab. If this happens it will immediately tell the unit to turn on.

If your hose is turned off and you plug it in correctly the unit won’t turn on until you flip the switch.

 

Troubleshooting a Central Vacuum

 

Sometimes people buy a power nozzle and hose kit, go to use it, and then notice there’s no suction. The suction will not come from the power nozzle, wand, or hose. It will only come from the central vacuum unit. 

If you’re noticing that it’s not picking up as well as it used to, or as well as you think it should, you’ll want to check the suction at the unit itself.

 

First, make sure you hose is unplugged from all your wall outlets.

 

Then go out to the unit and find the on-off switch on the side. Flip it to on and the vacuum should turn on.

 

Once it’s on, go throughout your house and find all of the wall outlets. While the vacuum is running open each outlet and test the suction with your hand. If you’re having trouble even opening the flap you probably have adequate suction.

 

If you check the outlet and it doesn’t seem to have much suction, visually inspect it for signs of a clog. Check any piping you can access for clogs.

 

If there doesn’t appear to be a clog, you’ll want to check the tank on the bottom of the unit. Dump the dirt bin out and clean it. While you’re checking the dirt bin, go ahead and check that all of the filters are clean as well.

 

If the vacuum has good suction and everything is clean, you can move on to the hose. Make sure the flip the power switch on the central vac unit to off! This way it won’t just be running by itself without direction from the hose. 

When you plug the hose in make sure that the central vacuum unit turns on and that the power nozzle turns on. When you turn the hose on it should turn both of those parts on.

Now plug your hose in. In this example we show the pigtail style hose that needs to be plugged into the wall outlet. Depending on the style of hose, make sure it is plugged in correctly.

 

When you flip your hose switch to the #1 setting, it should just turn the central vacuum unit on. You should hear the suction turn on at the wall outlet when you do this. You can also go out to where the central vac unit is and make sure it’s on.

 

If you turn the hose to the #2 setting, both the power nozzle and the central vacuum unit should turn on. Some power heads have their own additional on-off switch, so after you turn the hose on check that the power head itself doesn’t need turned on!

 

Some power heads, like the one in our demonstration, need to have the pivot released for the power nozzle to turn on. If you were to turn the hose on with the pivot still locked, the power nozzle won’t turn on.

 

Now, if the power nozzle and the central vacuum unit are both turning on, but you STILL don’t have suction you’ll need to check the suction on your hose. Turn everything on, disconnect your hose, and check the suction at the end with your hand. If there’s poor suction there is likely a clog in the hose itself. You could try straightening a wire coat hanger and carefully insert it to dislodge any clogs. A broomstick also works to get at least a few feet into the hose.

 

One other trick you can try is inserting the end of the hose into the front suction nozzle of the central vac unit and try to suction the clog back out.

 

Two more places to check for clogs, if the hose is clear, include the main electrical wand and the power nozzle.

 

Disconnect the wand and you should easily be able to look through it. If you see light there is no clog and you can move in. If you see a clog you can use a coat hanger or broomstick and push it out.

 

 

If the wand is fine you can look down into the pivot of the power nozzle to check for a clog. You can also look behind the brush roll. If there is a clog you will typically see debris lodged there. If you see a clog in the pivot head you can try sticking the hose directly in to attempt to suck it out, or use a coat hanger.

 

Need a central vac? Check out the Prolux CV12000 featured in the video here!

 

Need to clean the filters on your central vacuum? We have a video for that!

 

If you need any parts, supplies or have any other questions, email us at service@greatvacs.com or leave a comment! You can also head on over to our YouTube channel to see more educational videos on all of our products.

 

 

Central Vacuums 101: Frequently Asked Questions

Central Vacuums 101: Frequently Asked Questions

Is your central vacuum acting up? If it’s making weird noise, or just doesn’t have enough suction, this video is for you. Andrew goes over many common problems or...

Read more

Finally!  A vacuum made for women.   Lighter, Easier, Faster!

The Prolux Bagless Backpack vacuum's new patent pending technology is the world’s only bagless backpack vacuum where the user can hardly feel it, because not only does it only weight 8 lbs, but about 80% of the weight is put on the users hips. This makes cleaning fast and easy (2x faster than standard uprights) and is especially beneficial for woman users.

 

 

Even though women still clean more than men, most vacuums are still bulky, heavy, and require a lot of upper body strength. Basically, most vacuum cleaners are still designed for men.

 

Introducing the new technology of the Prolux bagless backpack vacuum! It is designed to cut cleaning time in half and be so light that the user can barely feel it.

 

As the inventors of this patent pending technology, how did we come up with it? From my wife, of course! One day, while climbing up the stairs my wife pulled a stomach muscle. Angrily, she said “Being in the vacuum industry, why don’t you invent a vacuum made for women and one that cleans faster!?”

 

The cleaning faster ideas was easy. Backpack vacuums! They clean about twice as fast as the standard upright vacuum. However, the problem with most backpack vacuums is that they’re heavy and bulky. Most women find them very uncomfortable. Even though I have about three times the upper body strength of my wife, she could hold a baby for an hour with no problem, but it would kill my back. How was this possible?

 

Research shows that, while men have more upper body strength, women have larger hips and knees and a lower center of gravity. Current backpack vacuum technology had the motor at the top, which placed all the weight at the user’s shoulders. Most of them don’t place ANY weight on the user’s hips.

 

The 8-pound Prolux bagless backpack vacuum is the world’s only backpack vacuum with the motor at the bottom of the unit, which allows about 80% of the weight to rest on the user’s hips.

 

It has a tool for nearly every job and amazing 102 cfm of cyclonic power, this vacuum is designed to cut your cleaning time in half.

 

If you’re ready to do something else with your time, consider the patent pending Prolux bagless backpack vacuum today!

 

Don't forget, GreatVacs is the only authorized dealer of Prolux products, so if you need any parts, supplies or have any questions, email as service@greatvacs.com or leave a comment! You can also head on over to our YouTube channel to see more educational videos on all Prolux products.

 

 

Finally! A vacuum made for women. Lighter, Easier, Faster!

Finally!  A vacuum made for women.   Lighter, Easier, Faster!

The Prolux Bagless Backpack vacuum's new patent pending technology is the world’s only bagless backpack vacuum where the user can hardly feel it, because not only...

Read more